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Silicone RC shock oil for pellet lube?

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Pauly5 View Drop Down
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    Posted: 27 Jan 2024 at 11:29am
Sound reasoning.

You always need a base line to reference results to as well, so it pays not to make changes until you know what the std setups/lubes/no lubes do.
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RangerPete View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RangerPete Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Jan 2024 at 11:46pm
So after giving all of this much thought (but not much testing I must admit) I have come to the following LOGICAL conclusion, (because if you think about something for long enough, then come to a well thought out conclusion, that must me logic, right? Of course!)

My conclusions are thus: looking at the shape of a Diabolo style pellet, the only points of contact between the pellet and the barrel are the widest part of the head, and the widest part of the skirt. Expressed as a percentage of the whole surface area of the pellet, that is a very small percent of the pellet that makes contact with the barrel.
I feel it is not worth lubing the entire surface of the pellet, just to get a minute amount of lube onto the bearing surfaces where it contacts the barrel.
So I don’t think it's worth lubing pellets. You would probably be better off trying to lube the inside of the barrel, but that’s another discussion for another time.
And besides I have achieved excellent accuracy from many pellet guns shooting thousands of unlubed pellets, so I’m going to go with the “if it’s not broken, don’t fix it” theory and shelve the “pellet lube” idea.

Slugs on the other hand, well, now they are a different kettle of fish.
Exponentially greater bearing surface between slug and barrel, and with the absence of an expanding skirt to seal the barrel and keep pressure behind the pellet, slugs rely on a tighter fit to seal the barrel and stop air escaping around the slug.
They will almost certainly benefit from a lube to 1- ease the passage of the slug through the barrel, and 2- help seal any tiny gaps between the lead and the barrel with a viscous layer of lube.

Now I feel that the requirements for an accurate pellet shooting gun, and the requirements for an accurate slug shooting gun are different enough to warrant having two separate guns, each set up specifically to do the required job. And seeing that I don’t yet have a dedicated high pressure, long barreled slug launcher, my theories on slug lubing will have to wait, but hopefully not for too long, until proper lubed slug testing can begin.
Walk quietly, but carry a big stick.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kruzaroad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Oct 2023 at 5:56pm
There was napier nz but he shut down.
Still had heaps of stock. Emailed him and they weren't selling any as they were trying to bulk sell the stock on.
So there may well be a stash somewhere.
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Declan View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Declan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Oct 2023 at 4:20pm
Yes, a very good post, especially as it alerts us all to the potential for mineral oil based lubes to ignite/explode ( very much like how a Diesel engine works).
For pellet lube I use Napier Power Pellet lube. This product is not mineral oil based. It can be difficult to buy in NZ but can be purchased on the web and shipped here.
https://www.napieruk.com/products/power-pellet-lube-10ml
I don’t believe all the manufacturers claims but it does keep the bore clean(er).

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kruzaroad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Oct 2023 at 1:18pm
You'll probly find that lubricant designed for use around food production is pretty free of petrolium products.
I'd still go with the diver seal lube.
It will be a much better bet.
I know when I was getting my dive masters, years ago that they were very specific about using lube made for the seals as most other things would cause a reaction due to the high pressure.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RangerPete Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Oct 2023 at 12:59pm
High Pressure is a rather broad term, its like how long is a piece of string.
I know nothing about nothing, but to me high pressure means anything above one att/bar.

Any way, so I looked on the two lube bottles, the rock n roll chain lube says "contains petrolium distilates". So does that mean it will go bang, or you'll just get a distilled bang??? LOL
The RC shock oil dosent give any indregients... but feels nice and slippery when you rub it between your fingers.
And that got me thinking about another type of silicone based lube... Hummm.
I doubt there would be any pretrolium based stuff in bedroom silicon based lube? surely not. Could give you one hell of a bang! LOL 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mercs Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Oct 2023 at 9:25pm
I would consider the term HPA refers to the source and this will depend on the technology but would appear to be in reference to the 3000 - 4500psi components.

In general any time I come across the term it indicates that the high pressure reservoir or bottle is separated from the pistol or rifle (paintball marker) and pressure reduction is a fixed part of the reservoir before entering the flexible connecting hose.

When checking SCUBA tank sites they refer to "high pressure air" but do not seem to use the abbreviation HPA.

Pre-charged pneumatic (PCP): I take as meaning the high pressure reservoir is attached directly to or is an integral part of the pistol or rifle and the full pressure can be utilised with or without an inbuilt regulator.

It would be great if we can find a standardised reference. (worth a google)

The paintball sport look to have some very strict test protocols to confirm operating pressure and associated velocities before commencing any activity.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Pauly5 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Oct 2023 at 9:17am
Thanks Mercs.

So if I was talking to an engineer to design an air tank for a pcp, would they consider HPA as the correct term? Does HPA refer to the 800 - 900 psi, with another term being used for the higher pressures ie 3000 psi?

Please don't get me wrong, i'm not trying to find fault with your comment, it's just that I have built a pcp pistol using clear instructions on the tank.  But looking at other ways t build it I would need to ask someone in the know, and if they aren't an airgunner, is HPA the term they would use?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RangerPete Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Oct 2023 at 9:23pm
Good post Mercs, thanks 👍🏻
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mercs View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mercs Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Oct 2023 at 1:29pm
Air Gun Pressures - always consult the owners manual before applying any lubricant

Break Barrel, Under Lever, Side Lever and Pumper spring powered air rifles are generally @ 1500 psi.

CO2 bottles, cartridges or capsules are at 800 - 900 psi.

HPA (High Pressure Air) is generally 850 psi regulated from a separate storage bottle at 3000 psi.

PCP (Pre-charged Pneumatic) is from an onboard reservoir generally 3000 psi.

PCP regulated units generally operate at 2000 psi fed from an onboard reservoir at 3000 - 4500 psi.

PCP regulators provide a consistent pellet velocity.
PCP regulators are often adjustable.

PCP rifles require a FAL (Fire Arms License)

HPA technology comes from the paintball sport.

CO2 powered units may have a specialist lube requirement such as Crosman Pelgun Oil.
Break barrel units may require some lube but this will be a specialist non flammable product.
HPA is unlikely to require lube.

PCP - No Lubrication to the High Pressure Parts.


Example of Specialist Silicone based Oil for Crosman Springer Airguns which is used sparingly.



Edited by mercs - 08 Oct 2023 at 1:33pm
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